Kids Being Weird

Leaf blowers are great for clearing leaves and for letting dentists check if you have a cavity.

And you think ice cream headaches are bad when you eat them with your mouth.

Nobody likes it when their dinner is burnt. But this kid likes it when her dinner is burnt sienna.

This is either a kid acting silly, or your scariest nightmare has suddenly come true.

You can see more of this kid in the upcoming film, The Teddy Bear Chainsaw Massacre.

A drum might seem like an odd place for a bed…until you remember how bored you get when you go to a concert and have to sit through a drum solo.

This kid was bitten by a radioactive spider AND a radioactive owl.

This just goes to prove that some kids are harder to potty train than others.

We’re not sure if she’s any good at playing the recorder, but we are sure she doesn’t get many people asking to borrow it.

This kid had a little mix-up. First he put his plate on his head, then he ate his spaghetti out of a Fedora.

This kid is half human, half Muppet, and all awesome.

This kid took it literally when he heard the expression, “Trick or treat, smell my feet.”

So I suppose when you sit down, you face the wall, not the floor? Conformist.

Either this kid is weird for getting stuck in the couch, or the couch is weird for wanting to eat a kid.

This kid might be the weirdest of all. Why would you eat dry dog food instead of dog food that comes with gravy?

Titles that Make Mundane Jobs Sound Fancier

By Kaylin Pound, Elite Daily

Underwater Ceramic Technician

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Transparency Enhancement Facilitator

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Document Imaging Specialist

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Media Distribution Officer

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High Environmental Hygienist

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Nightlife Promotions Entrepreneur

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Brand Champion

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Sanitation Engineer

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Mobile Sustenance Facilitator

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Talent Delivery Specialist

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Public Waste Technician

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Education Center Nourishment Consultant

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Five A Day Collection Operative

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Ceramic Receptacle Relocation Technician

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Coordinator Of Interpretive Teaching

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Cash Flow Specialist

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Petroleum Transfer

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Administrative Communication Mediator

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10 Things Doctors Have Reconsidered This Century

We’ve seen this many times before. One day doctors say X, Y and Z are good for you, only to change their minds a few months or years or decades later. How do we ever know what to believe? There’s really no answer to this, of course. Physicians and other medical professionals work hard to learn all about the human body and how it responds to everything from food and exercise to drugs, tests and medical interventions. Sometimes their advice is good, sometimes it’s bad, sometimes it’s neutral.

Although the 21st century is still in its infancy, doctors have already changed their opinions on many things. Here are 10 of the more prominent medical issues where they’ve rethought conventional wisdom — or at least they’re vigorously debating it. Because even doctors can’t always agree with one another.

10
Mammogram Frequency
Some health organizations and doctors have changed their yearly mammogram recommendation to a biennial checkup. monkeybusinessimages/iStock/Thinkstock
Some health organizations and doctors have changed their yearly mammogram recommendation to a biennial checkup. MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

For decades, women were urged to have annual mammograms — tests that screen for breast cancer and abnormalities — starting at age 40, and then yearly afterward. Most women don’t exactly enjoy undergoing a mammogram, as the standard film test involves squishing your breasts in between two plates. So women rejoiced to hear the latest medical thinking: that they may not need mammograms quite that frequently.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in 2009 updated its recommendations to biennial film mammograms and only for women ages 50-74. The reason for the change? The Task Force says studies show that while mammograms do a good job detecting early-stage breast cancer, they don’t spot advanced cases any earlier. False positives, common in mammography, are also more typical in those 40-49; these erroneous results can cause much anxiety, plus unnecessary additional procedures such as more imaging or biopsies. Finally, some of the women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer and subsequently treated may not have needed the treatment, as their cancer may have been slow-growing and would never have resulted in death.Screening every other year, says the Task Force, maintains the benefits of mammograms while reducing its harmful effects by nearly half [sources: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, Pruthi].

While the evidence may seem compelling, not everyone agrees. The American Cancer Society, for example, continues to push for yearly mammograms starting at 40 [source: Pruthi]. Best advice? Consult with your physician and make your own decision.

9
Medical Marijuana
Since 1996, some 20 U.S. states have passed laws allowing marijuana's use for medicinal purposes. petdcat/iStock/Thinkstock
Since 1996, some 20 U.S. states have passed laws allowing marijuana’s use for medicinal purposes. PETDCAT/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

Marijuana is the most common illicit drug used in the U.S., although the federal government classifies it as a Schedule I substance. This means it has no medicinal uses and carries a high risk for abuse.

Studies show that when young people are heavy users, IQ loss often results. Smoking weed also carries the same risk as cigarette smoking: constant coughing, lung irritation, susceptibility to lung infections and cancer [source: National Institute on Drug Abuse ].

However, people have long clamored for the government to allow marijuana to be used for medicinal purposes, citing its help in treating seizures, medication-induced nausea and chronic pain from injuries. But physicians ignored these pleas, insisting the drug was far too dangerous.

Since 1996, some 20 states have passed laws allowing marijuana’s use for medicinal purposes, and medical professionals are witnessing its often-positive results. As a result, many physicians are changing their minds about legalization. Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr. Mehmet Oz are two prominent physicians who say they now support medical marijuana [source: Baca]. Gupta, for one, said in 2013 that he should have considered some of the “remarkable research” coming from smaller labs in foreign countries, plus the scores of patients testifying to how much medical marijuana helped their symptoms before making his decision. And in a 2014 survey, 56 percent of physicians said medical marijuana should be legalized nationwide [source: Rappold].

If nothing else, legalization allows researchers to study the drug’s interaction with the body; only 6 percent of current marijuana studies look at its medicinal properties [source: Welsh].

8
Transgender Classification
Transgender actress and advocate Laverne Cox, who is in the Netflix series 'Orange is the New Black' met with student journalists at Emerson College for a group interview in 2013. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Transgender actress and advocate Laverne Cox, who is in the Netflix series ‘Orange is the New Black’ met with student journalists at Emerson College for a group interview in 2013. JIM DAVIS/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

People who are transgender — that is, those who self-identity doesn’t match their biological sex — were long classified as having a psychological disorder. Specifically, the American Psychiatric Association called the condition “gender identity disorder” and added the term to its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM, in 1980 [source: Glicksman]. Although assigning transgender people this label ensured they had access to medical care, the term “disorder” carried a certain stigma.

In the fifth edition of the DSM, published in 2013, the term “gender identity disorder” was replaced with “gender dysphoria,” a less stigmatizing term [source:Lowder]. This is an acknowledgement that being transgender is simply something that can happen to human beings. It’s not a disorder in and of itself. You can be transgender and not seek or need treatment of any sort. However, if you have such intense distress being in the “wrong” body that you want to transition to the male or female form, that is considered having gender dysphoria. Physicians with transgender patients who have gender dysphoria are generally required to first be assessed by a mental health professional before undergoing any kind of medical intervention.

7
Value of Saturated Fats
Although calorie consumption from fat in America has fallen from 40 to 30 percent since the 1980s, obesity rates have soared. Doctors are rethinking the traditional advice to lower fat intake in order to lose weight. Samuel Kessler/E+/Thinkstock
Although calorie consumption from fat in America has fallen from 40 to 30 percent since the 1980s, obesity rates have soared. Doctors are rethinking the traditional advice to lower fat intake in order to lose weight. SAMUEL KESSLER/E+/THINKSTOCK

Saturated fats were given the heave-ho in the 1970s, when a landmark study linked coronary heart disease with high levels of total cholesterol. People were advised to reduce their fat intake to 30 percent of total calories and limit saturated fats to a mere 10 percent[source: Willey]. Reduced-fat products flooded the market — remember Snackwell cookies, anyone? — and we gobbled them up.

In 2014, some doctors say that was possibly the worst medical advice given in the past 40 years [source: Willey]. People gorged on low-fat products, which typically had loads of extra sugar to compensate for the flavor lost when saturated fats were lessened or removed. Obesity became an enormous problem. (The obesity rate among U.S. adults has more than doubled since the 1960s, from 13.4 to 35.7 percent [source: National Institutes of Health].) And heart disease didn’t diminish. Additional studies haven’t shown any significant link between saturated fats and higher risks of cardiovascular disease [source:Willey].

The current advice is to eat your fruits and veggies, eat healthy fats like those found in avocados, nuts and seeds, and enjoy saturated fats — like meat, cheese and eggs — in moderation. It’s the fats that keep you feeling fuller longer, and less prone to snacking. And when you do snack, pass on the sugary, highly-processed foods [source: Northrup].

6
Hormone Replacement Therapy
A variety of hormone replacement products are displayed. A 2002 study on the dangers of hormone replacement therapy caused women everywhere to stop taking it. BSIP/UIG Via Getty Images
A variety of hormone replacement products are displayed. A 2002 study on the dangers of hormone replacement therapy caused women everywhere to stop taking it. BSIP/UIG VIA GETTY IMAGES

Menopausal women were overjoyed when hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was first rolled out in the early 20th century. After all, bolstering their declining estrogen levels with synthetic versions helped reduce hot flashes, mood changes and other annoying symptoms of menopausal and postmenopausal life. By the late 20th century, HRT doses were tailored to each woman, included progesterone and lower doses of estrogen, and were viewed as a way to combat osteoporosis. Vast numbers of menopausal women were taking HRT.

Then in 2002, a large hormone trial conducted by the U.S. Women’s Health Institute (WHI) was stopped early when it overwhelmingly showedHRT could cause heart disease, stroke, blood clots and breast cancer if taken on a long-term basis. Women worldwide panicked and stopped HRT [source: Bouchez]. But subsequent studies in the U.S. and U.K. say the issue is a bit more complex.

The original WHI study looked at women from age 50 to 79 and lumped their results together. Yet most of HRT’s harmful results occurred in the older women studied, not the typical HRT patients — women in their late 40s or early 50s.In 2012, international experts said HRT actually poses few risks for women in the latter age group [sources: Bouchez, Hope].

Today most physicians recommend using HRT if it’s needed, but for the shortest time possible, assuming you have no particular health risks.

5
Pulmonary Artery Catheters
Starting in the 1970s, patients in shock were often given a pulmonary artery catheter; later studies showed it did not improve patient outcomes. Thomas Northcutt/Photodisc/Thinkstock
Starting in the 1970s, patients in shock were often given a pulmonary artery catheter; later studies showed it did not improve patient outcomes. THOMAS NORTHCUTT/PHOTODISC/THINKSTOCK

Since its introduction in 1970, patients who landed in a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) were often given a PAC, or pulmonary artery catheter. Thecatheter, threaded into the right side of the heart via a blood vessel in the neck or groin, was a monitoring device that measured the pressure in the patient’s heart and lung blood vessels [source: NCIB]. By 1986, 20 to 40 percent of all ICU patients got one — surprising, since the device’s safety, accuracy and benefits were never proven [source: Marik].

Although complications from the use of a PAC were uncommon, and PAC-associated deaths rare, patients sometimes suffered from bleeding in the lung and changes in heart rhythm [source: NCIB]. Eventually, studies from 1990s and early 2000s showed the routine use of a PAC with patients in shock was actually inferior to less-invasive strategies, as the PAC could be unreliable and inaccurate and did not improve patient outcomes. Further, newer devices were developed that produced better results and were less invasive. In 2014, the device is rarely used on patients in shock [source: Marik].

4
Asperger’s Syndrome and Autism
This man with Asperger's syndrome outlines a picture in his studio. Asperger's used to be considered a separate disorder from autism but the 2013 DSM merges them together under the "autism spectrum disorder" category. Huntstock/Getty Images
This man with Asperger’s syndrome outlines a picture in his studio. Asperger’s used to be considered a separate disorder from autism but the 2013 DSM merges them together under the “autism spectrum disorder” category. HUNTSTOCK/GETTY IMAGES

Asperger’s syndrome was officially recognized in 1994, when it was added to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders(DSM), the diagnostic guide recognized by the American Psychiatric Association. Although sometimes referred to as a high-functioning form of autism, the guide specified Asperger’s was a distinct disorder [source: Hamilton]. Those with Asperger’s have a hard time interacting with others and often are intensely interested in a particular topic, say trains, talking about them nonstop. While autism is also a developmental disorder, its symptoms are more pronounced. Autistic people tend to have more difficulty interacting with others — sometimes they simply can’t — and often exhibit repetitive behaviors, such as flapping their arms or rocking.

In 2013, the DSM’s fifth edition was published. Asperger’s and autism were merged into the guide’s new “autism spectrum disorder” category. The change was one of the most controversial in the new DSM-5 [source: Parry]. While many people with Asperger’s don’t see themselves as autistic at all — most can function independently in society — the broader category was seen by health care professionals as more reliable. Previously, when trying to diagnose a patient with one of these disorders, clinicians mainly relied on the patient’s language skills. Reasonably good skills could mean Asperger’s; less-developed ones might mean autism [source: Hamilton]. But that’s a subjective call, and someone’s language skills can change over time. With one category, the hope is to focus on how to best help the patient, not the specific label.

3
Body Mass Index (BMI)
Even if you can pinch more than an inch, it doesn’t necessarily mean you're fat. The body-mass index is under fire because it doesn't factor in your age, gender or muscle mass. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images
Even if you can pinch more than an inch, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re fat. The body-mass index is under fire because it doesn’t factor in your age, gender or muscle mass. PETER DAZELEY/GETTY IMAGES

Back in the old days, doctors looked at life insurance tables to determine healthy weights for patients. These listed healthy weight ranges for men and women based on their heights. But life insurance companies had their own tables, and they weren’t always the same. So in 1998 the National Institutes of Health unveiled the Body Mass Index (BMI) as a way for everyone to figure out healthy weights in the same manner. To calculate someone’s BMI, you divide the person’s weight in pounds by his height in square inches, then multiply the result by 703. A good BMI is 18.5-24.9, according to the National Institutes of Health, while a BMI of 25-29.9 means you’re overweight. Anything 30 or more? Obese. BMI was quickly adopted by most health professionals [source: Zelman].

In 2014, the BMI was under fire because it doesn’t factor in your age, gender or muscle mass. There’s also no distinction between lean and fat body mass. Basketball superstar Michael Jordan, for example, had a 27-29 BMI in his prime — meaning he was overweight — despite sporting a chiseled frame and less-than-30-inch (76-centimeter) waist. Similarly, elderly people on the roly-poly side might have normal BMIs because they’ve lost muscle mass, and muscle weighs more than fat. Many health professionals now say you should use BMI as just one measure of health and fitness, along with factors such as body fat percentage, waist circumference and level of physical activity [source: Zelman].

2
Stenting for Stable Coronary Artery Disease
Until 2006, many patients with stable angina (chest pain from overexertion) were given stents, tubular supports that prop open blocked arteries, but 2007 studies showed stents are helpful mainly for patients with unstable angina or heart attacks. PIXOLOGICSTUDIO/ Science Photo Library/Getty Images
Until 2006, many patients with stable angina (chest pain from overexertion) were given stents, tubular supports that prop open blocked arteries, but 2007 studies showed stents are helpful mainly for patients with unstable angina or heart attacks. PIXOLOGICSTUDIO/ SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/GETTY IMAGES

If you develop stable coronary artery disease, also called stable angina, you’ll notice chest pain when you exert yourself. This is because your arteries are narrow or blocked, reducing the amount of oxygen-rich blood your heart can receive. The pain will go away when you rest and reoccur when you exert yourself the same amount and/or the same amount of time.

Today’s standard treatment for stable angina includes lifestyle changes (such as quitting smoking, losing weight and exercising) and medications, including aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and statins. But as recently as 2006, many patients with stable angina were also given stents, which are tubular supports that prop open your narrowed or blocked arteries, allowing more blood to reach your heart [source: Mitka]. Stents are placed during a procedure called angioplasty.

Stents are great when used in those who have had a heart attack or develop unstable angina, which is chest pain that occurs suddenly and frequently with little or no exertion. But studies dating from 2007 revealed stents don’t offer any additional help at all if you’ve got stable angina. All you need are some lifestyle changes and maybe some of the medicines listed above [source: Mitka]. Good news for those who hate to go under the knife.

1
Use of Pain Pumps in Joints
Dr. K. Dean Willis takes an X-ray of an implanted pain pump in a patient at the Alabama Pain Center in 2014. The FDA now requires pain pump and local anesthetic manufacturers to warn against pain pump use in joints. Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Dr. K. Dean Willis takes an X-ray of an implanted pain pump in a patient at the Alabama Pain Center in 2014. The FDA now requires pain pump and local anesthetic manufacturers to warn against pain pump use in joints. LINDA DAVIDSON/THE WASHINGTON POST VIA GETTY IMAGES

In the late 1990s, orthopedic surgeons began using pain pumps in some of their procedures. The postsurgical devices pump local anesthetics through a plastic tube to a specific area of the body for pain relief. By inserting pain pumps after surgery, patients were able to avoid long hospital stays. The pumps were also considered safer for pain relief than prescription narcotics [source: Thomas]. Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) never cleared the use of pain pumps in joints, surgeons eventually began using them in shoulder surgeries, and to a lesser extent in knee surgeries. (Physicians are permitted to use FDA-approved devices in such an “off label” fashion, which means for another purpose than that which the FDA originally indicated.)

But after they started using the pumps in joint surgeries, orthopedic surgeons began noticing many young, active patients developing post-surgicalchondrolysis, a rare ailment where joint cartilage dies. The pain pumps and their medications were blamed. Those in the medical profession now say exposing sensitive cartilage to local anesthetics for up to 72 hours can destroy the cartilage, and most surgeons no longer use them in this fashion. The FDA now also requires pain pump and local anesthetic manufacturers to warn against use in joints [source: FDA].


Author’s Note: 10 Things Doctors Have Completely Changed Their Minds About This Century

My older daughter had a pain pump inserted into her knee after ACL surgery and developed chondrolysis at the age of 18. She was told to expect a knee replacement as soon as she’s old enough (about 40). Hopefully all surgeons have stopped using these devices in joints.

The Most Badass of Famous Last Words

By Kate Willert. Guff.com

“Soldiers, when I give the command to fire, fire straight at my heart. Wait for the order. It will be my last to you. I protest against my condemnation. I have fought a hundred battles for France, and not one against her … Soldiers, fire!”

Michel Ney, a military commander during the Napoleonic Wars, was being tried for treason and due to be executed. His lawyer tried to get him released by stating that Ney’s birthplace had been annexed by Prussia, which meant that he couldn’t be tried for treason. Ney straight up interrupted him (v. badass) and said, “I am French and I will remain French.” (v. badass and v. French)

On December 6th, 1815, he was sentenced to execution by firing squad. He refused to wear a blindfold.

“Could you arrange to have my body hauled to the state line to be buried? I don’t want to be found dead in Utah.”

Sick Utah burn, bro. Swedish-American labor activist and member of theIndustrial Workers of the World, Joe Hill was accused of the murder of a grocer named John G. Morrison and his son Arling. Hill had gone to a local doctor that night with a bullet wound in his left lung (like you do on Saturday night) caused by an argument over a woman. Because he had a pistol and a red bandana (which was witnessed on the gunmen), he was charged with murder and sentenced to death by firing squad.

Because Hill was foreign, a transient worker and a vocal union activist, it’s believed that he was framed for a crime that he didn’t commit. Prior to his execution, Hill wrote into the socialist newspaper, Appeal to Reason, and stated, “Owing to the prominence of Mr Morrison, there had to be a ‘goat’ [scapegoat] and the undersigned being, as they thought, a friendless tramp, a Swede, and worst of all, an IWW, had no right to live anyway, and was therefore duly selected to be ‘the goat’.”

We then imagine that he dropped the mic.

“I see you have made three spelling mistakes.”

Thomas de Mahy was a French aristocrat during the French Revolution…and his last words are a perfect illustration of that.

“The war is at its height — wear my armor and beat my war drums. Do not announce my death.”

Korean naval commander Yi Sun-sin had been shot by a single, deadly bullet during Battle of Noryang in 1598 when the Koreans had almost pushed the Japanese out of the Korean Peninsula. He didn’t want his soldiers’ morale to falter right before victory.

BAMF.

“I must go in, for the fog is rising.”

Dickinson was known for exploring the topics of death and immortality in her poetry, so these last words were very #OnBrand.

“This wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. Either it goes or I do.”

Perma-sassy Oscar Wilde, writer of The Picture of Dorian Gray among many other things, was known for his belief that, in terms of art (and life), style was more important than substance.

Hence his hatred for that ugly-ass wallpaper.

Keystone / Getty Images

“Jakie, is it my birthday or am I dying?”

Lady Nancy Astor, an American-born English socialite and the first female member of British Parliament, was surrounded by all of her children while she was bedridden with an illness.

You can’t pull a fast one on grandma.

“Do not forget to show my head to the people, it is well worth seeing.”

If this painting is anything like the real thing, we believe him.

“A party! Let’s have a party.”

Margaret Sanger, a birth control activist and creator of various organizations that became the prototype for Planned Parenthood, advocated for sex education and birth control throughout her life, making her a pretty big target for hatred.

A party is the least they could do.

“More weight.”

Anyone who has seen The Crucible knows that Giles Corey had more cajones than most. During the Salem Witch Trials, Corey and his wife were both accused of witchcraft. He refused to plead guilty or not guilty and was sentenced to a pressing so he would confess.

They loaded the weight on top of him and asked him if he would confess. His response?

“More weight.”

“Damn it! Don’t you dare ask God to help me!”

Joan Crawford, famous actress and president of the anti-wire hanger club, yelled this at her housekeeper when the poor woman decided to pray for her (we’re guessing super duper chill) boss.

“Hold up the train. Ammunition ship afire in harbor making for Pier 6 and will explode. Guess this will be my last message. Good-bye boys.”

On December 6th, 1917, Patrick Vincent Coleman, a train dispatcher, saw the French munitions ship SS Mont-Blanc collide with the Norwegian ship SS Imo. The Mont-Blanc was filled to the brim with explosives; the crash caused a fire to begin on board and the ship to run aground. Coleman saw that the Mont-Blanc was incredibly close to a rail line and was going to explode into a million pieces, probably killing everyone in the vicinity.

Coleman telegraphed the above message to the overnight express train No. 10 that was carrying nearly 300 passengers. The train stayed halted in its station and all of its passengers were saved.

The explosion was so large that it decimated all the buildings in an 800 meter (2600 foot) radius, snapped trees in half with its pressure wave and killed around 2000 people, including Coleman.

“Good. A woman who can fart is not dead.”

On her death bed, Louise-Marie-Therese de Saint Maurice let out a toot to end all toots. This was her response.

And then she died.

That’s my kind of lady.

“I want the world to be filled with white fluffy duckies.”

While this isn’t particularly badass, at least he was specific. Let’s get him some damn white fluffy duckies!

The Life Goals of Children

1 Material Boy

“…Get super rich, dump my girlfriend, kiss lots of gold diggers and finally end up in a shallow, empty marriage wondering what the hell went wrong.”
2 Playing Dog

“…I could run around and play all day with the other dogs and never have to get a job, which as we all know, destroys every ounce of your spirit.”
3 Facial Hair Fanatic

“…I don’t know what I was saying with the bit about the mint. And I don’t even want to be much bigger. I was just nervous to finally speak my truth… To come out as a beard enthusiast.”
4  Sports Star

“…My teacher said anything is possible if you put your mind to it, so I’ll see you on the court, losers!”
5  The Single Life

“…I only need me, myself and I in this life. And before you say it, no I’m not jaded because Sally kissed Matthew on the jungle gym at lunch even though she SPECIFICALLY SAID we were going steady.”
6  The Circle Of Life

“…Because life is a circle in which we live, die and become one with the earth. We are all but potatoes on a journey that’s endless, yet utterly beautiful.

I learned that from The Lion King.”
7  ‘Mythical’ Creatures

“…Rubeus jr. didn’t mean that; he was just being facetious. The Hagrid hut-hold understands that dragon breeding is illegal and has absolutely no involvement in such activities.”

Sincerely,

Rubeus Hagrid

Professor of Care of Magical Creatures

Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry
8 Hats Off

“…Some people tell me I live too much in the present. But, I literally don’t think I’ll get a hat until I’m at least 35. It just doesn’t seem like something I could pull off and I want to get past that awkward, self-doubting phase before I give it a try, you know?”
9 Supermarket Sweep

“…This is the last thing I saw an adult do and, as an imaginatively limited child, I have to just go with that.”
10  Lazy Boy

“…I know this probably seems controversial, but I’m just saying what everyone’s thinking. Who wants to do stuff? Stuff is smelly and for losers.”